African clawed frogs

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Marnix Hoekstra
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African clawed frogs

Post by Marnix Hoekstra » Fri Mar 26, 2004 1:15 am

Hello,
Does anyone know if our turtles can eat African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis)? I did a quick search and found that other Asian turtles like Cuora amboinensis and C.trifasciata eat tadpoles.
I can get A.c.f. tadpoles from a laboratory that uses them for research. And since they're going to be killed anyway... they might as well be turned into food.
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Marnix

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African clawed frogs

Post by a forum member » Tue Mar 30, 2004 7:10 pm

Well, different continents you know.
I might be worried about parasites. But Xenopus is bred in enormous numbers for research in many places in the world so they would be a chea food source that will be continually available for sure. Ands maybe they are "cleaner" since they are so long captive bred. I think Grandis would possibly eat them but do your chase live foods? Mine never did. I guess you could pre kill.

-rob

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African clawed frogs

Post by Marnix Hoekstra » Thu Apr 01, 2004 2:30 am

Hi Rob,
Good point. I'll ask the lab if the tadpoles are parasite-free. I was worried about neurotoxins in their skin, but I was told their skin isn't toxic before they turn into real frogs.
And yes, my turtles chase live food. But they're too clumsy to catch anything. I used to keep them together with red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans). The red-eared sliders were agile fish-catchers, and I suspect that the grandises try to mimic them.
Marnix

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Re: African clawed frogs

Post by DHemby » Sat Mar 15, 2008 12:11 am

african clawed frogs at there adult stage carry a small amount of poison in the claws. i know that there claws are to small to puncture skin but the toxin being injested might cause a problem. this is info i was given while working in a pet smart so it might not be completely accurate.

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