gender & subspecies

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Peter Paul
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gender & subspecies

Postby Peter Paul » Fri Dec 01, 2000 5:55 pm

Dear All,

I'm not aware of subspecies having beenn described in Heosemys grandis.
Meanwhile, sexing the species is easy - males have a somewhat concave plastron, a proportionally much larger tail, and apparently can reach a larger maximum size
(fairly standard sexual differences for turtles and tortoises, as in Marnix' photos).

All the best,
Peter Paul van dijk

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Marnix Hoekstra
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gender & subspecies

Postby Marnix Hoekstra » Wed Dec 06, 2000 6:00 pm

Dear Peter Paul,

Thank you for joining the club.
If you don't know of any subspecies that have been described, then I'm pretty sure they haven't been described.
But can you tell us something about the two subtypes that are mentioned e.g. in
http://emys.geo.orst.edu/collection/spe ... andis.html and do you know how to distinguish them?
If there are different types of H.grandis then it may be necessary to identify captive H.grandis and to avoid crossbreeding between them.
The aforementioned webpage says:
TYPES: 2 Syntypes: BMNH 1947.3.4.7 (Camboja) and 1947.3.4.55 (Pachebone).
TYPE LOCALITY: "Camboja" (=Kampuchea) and "Pachebone" (? in Burma).

With best regards,
Marnix

Peter Paul
expert member
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Nov 30, 2007 6:45 am
Location: Virginia, USA

gender & subspecies

Postby Peter Paul » Thu Dec 07, 2000 11:02 am

Dear All,

There seems to be some confusion about the meaning of 'syntypes'. When describing a new species, the describer designates a type or type series (normally preserved museum specimens). If there is more than one specimen, these are called 'syntypes'. Normally a single specimen from the type series is designated as the 'holotype', and the others are then paratypes. (or if only a single specimen is available to the describer, that is automatically a holotype).
In the case of Heosemys grandis, when John Gray described the species in 1860, he had twoo specimens available to him, one from Cambodia and one from Pachebone (now in the Thai-Cambodia border region, not in Myanmar).

As far as I am aware no subspecies have been described for H. grandis, and no other taxa / names have been synonymised with it. The only nomenclatural changes have been transfers between the genera Geoemyda, Clemmys and Heosemys.

More practically, I have seen two H. grandis from Myanmar, lots from Thailand, and a few each from Malaysia, Cambodia and south Vietnam, and I cannot see any significant differences between them. Some individual variation, sure, like growth effects and male/female differences, but no consistent regional trends.

Hope this clarifies the situation.
All the best,
Peter Paul


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